CISPA: 6 Things You Need to Know About the Government’s New Spy Law
CISPA: 6 Things You Need to Know About the Government's New Spy Law

'Congress is seriously considering a bill called the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). Intended to allow information-sharing both between corporations and between corporations and the government, it presents serious dangers to individual privacy.'

Read more- CISPA: 6 Things You Need to Know About the Government’s New Spy Law

Revealed: CISPA Internet Spying Law Pushed by For-Profit Private Spy Lobby
Revealed: CISPA Internet Spying Law Pushed by For-Profit Private Spy Lobby

'A cyber security bill moving swiftly through Congress would give government intelligence agencies broad powers to work with private companies to share information about Internet users.'

Read more: Revealed: CISPA Internet Spying Law Pushed by For-Profit Private Spy Lobby

Anonymous Declares War On Religion, Attacks Church Sites

'The AnonymousIRC Twitter account announced on Friday three attacks so far on major church Web sites. These aren’t just regular attacks, however, as they have also defaced the Web sites with anti-religion rhetoric and even a video featuring Richard Dawkins set to auto-play so visitors are forced to see it.'

Read more: Anonymous Declares War On Religion, Attacks Church Sites

Who Do You Trust Less: The NSA or Anonymous?

'Intelligence officials seem to be polishing up their case to take on Anonymous like a 'stateless' terrorist group. The director of the National Security Agency, Gen. Keith Alexander, told various high-level audiences that the loosely affiliated group, Anonymous, would soon have the capability “to bring about a limited power outage through a cyberattack,” according to an anonymously sourced article in the Wall Street Journal today.'

Read more: Who Do You Trust Less: The NSA or Anonymous?

Scared of Anonymous? NSA chief says you should be

'Anonymous has so far plied its trade in “hactivist” exploits. But according to the director of the National Security Agency, it might soon turn its focus to U.S. infrastructure.'

Read more: Scared of Anonymous? NSA chief says you should be

PCFIPA: SOPA replacement uses child porn as excuse to spy on 99.7 percent of Americans

'The SOPA and PIPA bills that went down in flames earlier this year for their unbearable intrusiveness, used content piracy as an excuse to give the government powerful tools with which to censor Internet content. For 2012 the primary author of those bills has switched to a fallback tactic: using child porn as an excuse to create a vast surveillance network from which the government can demand data on every email sent, site visited or link clicked on by all but a fraction of one percent of the U.S. population.'

Read more: PCFIPA: SOPA replacement uses child porn as excuse to spy on 99.7 percent of Americans

Google Tracked iPhones, Bypassing Apple Browser Privacy Settings

'Google Inc. and other advertising companies have been bypassing the privacy settings of millions of people using Apple Inc.'s Web browser on their iPhones and computers—tracking the Web-browsing habits of people who intended for that kind of monitoring to be blocked.'

Read more: Google Tracked iPhones, Bypassing Apple Browser Privacy Settings

Anonymous is shutting down the internet?

'“To protest SOPA, Wallstreet, our irresponsible leaders and the beloved bankers who are starving the world for their own selfish needs out of sheer sadistic fun, On March 31, anonymous will shut the Internet down,” says the group.'

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Google confirms Iran choked off Internet access ahead of elections

'Search giant Google, Inc. confirmed Monday morning that its Gmail, YouTube and encrypted search services have been unavailable to Iranians since Feb. 10, the day that rumors began to circulate that the whole country had been taken offline.'

Read more: Google confirms Iran choked off Internet access ahead of elections

More than 30,000 Germans turn out against anti-piracy treaty ACTA

'Tens of thousands of Germans have protested against ACTA, a controversial international anti-piracy agreement that has embroiled Germany's politicians in a heated debate on whether the treaty is a useful tool to protect intellectual property or an infringement of personal freedom.

On Saturday, people turned out in droves for demonstrations all over Germany, in spite of temperatures as low as 5 degrees Fahrenheit. The biggest protests took place in Munich, where about 16,000 people took to the streets, and in Berlin, with 10,000 participants. Police estimate that all in all more than 30,000 demonstrators turned out in German towns and cities. The organizers of the protest put the number closer to 100,000.’

Read more: More than 30,000 Germans turn out against anti-piracy treaty ACTA